What ’bout some fancy dashboards for ya? Power BI vs. Geckoboard

In my capacity as the chief data analyst of bitstars, it’s one of my key responsibilities to regularly compile all relevant figures concerning our web platform HoloBuilder. These figures are mostly intended for people who don’t have the time to dive deeply into some fancy but complicated statistics. Hence, from the user experience perspective it’s crucial to provide them in an easy-to-understand and pleasant-to-look-at form. A well-established way of doing so are data visualizations of different forms which are provided in terms of dashboards for optimal accessibility. Since we are currently redesigning our internal process for providing figures and statistics, I’ve done some research on two potential software solutions that could be used for this.

Requirements

Since we are talking about a solution for our internal process at bitstars, there is a set of company-specific requirements a contemplable software has to fulfill. In particular, these requirements are:

Moreover, there are two nice-to-haves:

In the following, I investigate two possible solutions—Power BI and Geckoboard—, which are evaluated against the above requirements.

Power BI

Power BI WebsitePower BI is a cloud-based business analytics service provided by Microsoft. It comes as a part of the Office 365 suite, but can also be used standalone. There is an online as well as a desktop version, whereas the latter has a significantly larger range of functions. Power BI distinguishes between dashboards (“[…] something you create or something a colleague creates and shares with you. It is a single canvas that contains one or more tiles.”) and reports [“one or more pages of visualizations (charts and graphs)”]. Reports can be saved in the Power BI Desktop file format (.pbix); dashboards can be shared.

Power BI comes with a rather limited range of integrable services, among which are Google Analytics (☑) and MailChimp (☑). AdWords (☑) statistics can be integrated via Google Analytics if your respective accounts are connected. However, integration for Facebook Ads (✖), Pipedrive (✖) and AWS (✖) is still missing. FB Ads integration has been requested, but is yet to be realized. There is moreover functionality to integrate data from Excel and CSV files (from your computer or OneDrive) or Azure SQL databases, among others, which also enables you to import your own custom data.

The basic version of Power BI can be used for free while Power BI Pro comes for $9.99 per user & month.

How to create a cumulative chart in Power BI?

Cumulative charts are not a built-in functionality of Power BI, but can be easily realized using Data Analysis Expressions (DAX, ☑). That is, you have to create a new measure in your dataset. Assume, for instance, you want a cumulative chart of your sales (to be accumulated, Y axis) over time, which are only present in your dataset as the number of sales per date (X axis). The DAX formula for your new measure would be as follows:

Measure = calculate(
  SUM('Your Dataset'[Sales]);
  FILTER(
    all('Your Dataset'[Date]);
    'Your Dataset'[Date] <= max('Your Dataset'[Date])
  )
)

(found at http://www.daxpatterns.com/cumulative-total/). You can then simply add a chart visualizing your new measure (Y axis) per date (X axis) to your Power BI report to obtain your desired cumulative chart.

Geckoboard

Geckoboard WebsiteGeckoboard is a web platform for creating individual dashboards that show your business’s KPIs (key performance indicators), e.g., unique visits to your website, Facebook likes or sales per day. The platform has built-in support for integration of a wide range of external data sources, including Google Analytics (☑), AdWords (☑), Facebook Ads (☑), MailChimp (☑), Pipedrive (☑) and AWS (☑) and many more (in fact, way more compared to Power BI). Moreover, Geckoboard supports CSV and Google Sheets integration for your own custom data.

Like in Power BI, there is no built-in support for cumulative charts. However, since it is easily possible to create those in Google Sheets (see, e.g., this link), they can simply be imported and visualized in Geckoboard as well (☑). Of course, this means an additional intermediate step is required.

Geckoboard offers no free plan. Paid plans start from $49 per month for one user and two dashboards.

Conclusion

Power BI Geckoboard
Cumulative charts (☑)1 (☑)1
Google Analytics integration
AdWords integration
Facebook Ads integration
MailChimp integration
(Pipedrive integration)
(AWS integration)
overall rating ⭐⭐⭐ ⭐⭐⭐⭐

Both tools miss built-in functionality for cumulative charts, but provide means for importing own custom data. When it comes to the integration of third-party services, Geckoboard supports a significantly lager range of available data sources. Because of this, I give Power BI an overall rating of 3 out of 5 (⭐⭐⭐). Since the pricing is more expensive and cumulative charts require an additional intermediate step, but the overall package makes a better impression regarding what we need at bitstars, Geckoboard receives a rating of 4 out of 5 (⭐⭐⭐⭐).

To summarize, if you’re fine with Google Analytics stats and some custom data imported via Excel files or an Azure DB, go for Power BI. Yet, if you rely on the seamless integration of a wider range of external services, you’re clearly better off with Geckoboard—unless you wanna implement the integration of the different services’ APIs yourself in a DIY solution.

1 These are given in parentheses because an additional intermediate step is required.

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