UX vs. Product Design vs. UI: The Never-Ending Battle

Digital product design teams are often referred to as “the UX team” or “the UX/UI team,” which are terminologies that can significantly disturb a proper understanding of what UX and digital product design actually are and what a digital product design team does. For one, the user’s experience can’t be designed in the first place, and “doing UX” goes way beyond the scope of digital product design. For another, saying “UX/UI” isn’t meaningful since they’re neither the same nor separable concepts within a process; one can’t “do UI” without also “doing UX.” Generally speaking, digital product design covers design research, interaction design, and visual design, and it’s a much more accurate term for what’s commonly referred to as “UX” or “UX/UI.” We believe a proper understanding of terminology is essential for being able to deliver one’s best possible work as a designer.

User Experience Is an Elusive Thing, or Conversion Rate & Average Order Value Are Not UX Metrics!

In this article, I review six metrics commonly used to measure UX: conversion rate (CR), average order value (AOV), task success rate, time on task, Net Promoter Score® (NPS), and the System Usability Scale (SUS). CR, AOV, and NPS do not fulfil the definition of a UX metric while task success rate, time on task, and SUS do. Still, none of the metrics (alone) is suitable to reliably measure the UX of a digital product.

“Growth Marketing Considered Harmful” Published in i-com

I'm proud that my article "Growth Marketing Considered Harmful" has been published in the latest issue of i-com ‒ Journal of Interactive Media. Abstract: In today’s e-commerce industry, conversion rate optimization is often considered essentially the same as user experience optimization. In addition, there is a strong focus on quantitative experimentation, which some deem a… Continue reading “Growth Marketing Considered Harmful” Published in i-com

5 Foolproof Conversion Rate Optimizations for Your E-commerce Business

When hearing conversion rate optimization, many think of the application of psychological principles such as social proof or scarcity. But before employing those, e-commerce businesses first have to get their fundamentals down—which many don't. In this article, I present five foolproof (and proven) ways to optimize your conversion rate: optimizing your checkout, getting rid of shipping costs (as much as possible), focusing on usability, getting rid of dark patterns, and gaining a deep understanding of your customers.

My First Article for The Next Web

"It was during my Bachelor’s thesis that I first came into contact with user research; and after that, I fell in love with anything usability and UX design. Today, I’m a UX Manager and take care of a wide variety of design topics. But when you simply look at my diplomas, you wouldn’t expect any… Continue reading My First Article for The Next Web

Successful E-commerce Personalization in 3 (Relatively) Easy Steps

An effective personalization strategy should be treated as a design problem with a structured framework of ideation, implementation, and evaluation. Co-creation workshops are used to brainstorm audiences and personalized content based on credible hypotheses, which are then implemented and continuously monitored to assess the performance of the personalization strategy and individual campaigns. A good strategy focuses on UX while helping with achieving business goals.

How to Build and Lead User Experience (UX) Teams

This article presents 9 guidelines for building and leading UX teams. They are based on what I learned from the people who led me as well as my own experience: recruit diverse talent; set up a process (and iterate); involve other teams from the start; be fair; have regular ceremonies; pass on knowledge; have a vision; ask questions (a lot); and make UX visible.

More Design, More UX … And More Books

I know I was a little negligent of my blog in 2018 and 2019, and I didn't write nearly as much as I would have liked to. But I'm very determined to improve on this again. (As you might have noticed based on the last three articles I published in pretty quick succession before they… Continue reading More Design, More UX … And More Books

Jobs To Be Done in a Nutshell

The theory of Jobs To Be Done explains that too much focus on socio-demographic data and correlations hurts companies. Rather, you have to gain a deeper understanding of your customers, who "hire" your product to help them do certain jobs under certain circumstances. For instance, you don't buy a video game console because you're male and over 30. You hire it to, e.g., do the job "connect with friends".